Category: reading material

Moi.

Monday 09.10.12

Elle Décoration, the 25 year old French design publication, just launched their first issue of a new magazine called Elle Deco Lab. And, to my delight, they decided to include Mrs. Easton in a round up of design blogs that “will get you hooked!” The website packs in a lot of information and highlights many designs and designers that aren’t necessarily part of the familiar roster here in the United States. Well worth a look. I assume that the print publication will be available here in October. Usually arrives a month after it’s released in Europe. Oh, and in France, “je suis une blogueuse.” Merci Elle Deco Lab!

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44. Fear of Tall Giraffe.

Tuesday 05.29.12

When my friend Molly gave me this book years ago, I couldn’t figure out if she was sending me some kind of subtle message. Did she think I had issues? No, she did not. It’s just a great book. This volume may be a catalog of one man’s fears, but what’s crazy is that it turn out to be an inventory of all of our fears. More or less anyway. Hats off to Creativity Explored, in San Francisco, for giving Michael the support to create something so unique, yet so very universal. For more info on the book, go here.

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Animalloys

Tuesday 12.20.11

I love this little image. It’s a cigarette card (1.375″ x 2.675″) which I bought a couple of years ago while in San Francisco. Almost nightly when I was little, my mother used to read us The Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling. One of my favorites was about how the Armadillo came to be. According to Kipling, these odd little creatures were formed out of an alliance between a turtle and a hedgehog. Click here if you would like to see the entire NYPL collection of Animalloy cigarette cards.

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Diary Notes

Tuesday 11.22.11

I have NO idea how I ended up on Houseplant Picture Studio’s blog. But there I was. And I saw this crazy collection of scribbles and notations made in the margins, actually…all over…the pages of The Spiritual Diary. As far as I can tell, the volume is a collection of writings by Emanuel Swedenborg who was an 18th century Swedish scientist, inventor, philosopher, and theologian. He was an influential and unquantifiable figure for a wildly eclectic group of writers ranging from William Blake, Jorge Luis Borges, Arthur Conan Doyle, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Carl Jung and Immanuel Kant to the likes of Helen Keller, August Strindberg and W.B. Yeats. And he clearly inspired the owner of this little tome.

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Italy On My Mind

Thursday 11.10.11

At a loss for words? Want to be fluent in Italian? Just pick up this gem of a book, practice the gestures, and before you know it you’ll be freely communicating the entire length of the boot. Speak Italian was first published in 1958 by artist, photographer, sculptor and all around genius, Bruno Munari. The photographs capture something from a time long since past. But the gestures themselves are still as current as can be. The book (a bilingual edition) was reissued a number of years ago by Chronicle Books, something for which I am very grateful.

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Siberian Windows

Thursday 11.03.11

Dave Gilligan (a very talented photographer and graphic designer) and his new bride were not your typical newlyweds. As he tells it, they didn’t want to go on a typical “sun holiday” so instead opted for a far more interesting honeymoon on the Trans-Mongolian Railway. These photographs of windows were taken in Irkutsk as well as around Lake Baikal. Apparently, all the windows are painted a shade of Green, White or Blue to hopefully ward off evil spirits. Each and every one seems to me like a small fairy tale. If something about these images grabs your imagination, there are two books on Siberia that I would highly recommend reading: Colin Thubron’s In Siberia, and Ian Frazier’s Travels in Siberia, which was released only just last year.

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Botanique et Ornement

Friday 10.14.11

One of my favorite books. It measures in at 5.5″ x 8″. Part of a series of volumes that the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris put out years ago that are sadly no longer in print. The hand in these drawings is both expert and full of delight. The book itself is intimate in a way that not many are. It is true about all design being found in nature. I go back to these pages over and over again. I am particularly fond of the curlicues.

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